Daily Fix, April 4

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Friday, the government shuts down if the budget battles don’t lead to some sort of agreement. Some say both sides are trying to hurt each other as much as possible without actually shutting down, while others believe a shut-down is looming.

*Both major political parties seem to have the same strategy when it comes to budget negotiations: Hurt the other side as much as possible without actually negotiations to collapse. “The apparent urge to avoid a shutdown comes amid a political messaging war in which Democrats hope to cast Republicans as beholden to extremists in their ranks, while Republicans are seeking to cast Democratic leaders as unwilling to confront fiscal challenges head-on.” The Hill

*However, negotiations may be collapsing anyway. Today, Speaker Boehner said “It’s become sadly evident to me, and to the American people, that the White House and Senate Democrats are just not serious yet about enacting real spending cuts,” Boehner said. “If the government shuts down, it will be because Senate Democrats failed to do their job.” He called for a party caucus tonight, before meeting with the White House tomorrow morning. Politico

*A new poll by the Pew Research Center shows that 39% of Americans would blame the GOP, 36% would blame the Obama administration and 16% say both. Interestingly, 56% also says they want federal lawmakers to be more willing to compromise on this budget, while 36% say go ahead and shutdown the government. Pew Research

*So just what happens when the government “shuts down”? We’ve had two previous shut-downs, in 1995 and 1996. According to MSNBC, it actually cost the government money in back wages, lost revenue from shut-down national parks and the local economies and businesses surrounding those parks. Not all government workers go on a mandatory vacation, either. Essential staff still stay on duty – FBI and TSA workers, VA hospitals and military bases stay open, as would the US Postal Service, the prez and his employees and all members of Congress. We’ll find out this week if America will kinda, sorta grind to a halt. MSNBC

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5 Responses to “Daily Fix, April 4”

  1. James R Says:

    Seems like our budget and the future of the dollar is in serious trouble unless we can truly ween people off of government subsidies. DHHS subsidies constitute nearly half of the budget. If we want to make real changes, let’s focus on DHHS and overseas military who are not directly protecting our nation.

  2. Volunteer Says:

    Holly, thank you for your informative blog! It would be great if all our elected representatives felt the responsibility you do to communicate with your constituents, and the rest of us.

  3. Sue Connor Says:

    Trouble with cutting government subsidies is that we have too many poor unemployed people from prior past poor decisions and the middle class just keeps shrinking. It’s the richer people we need to help balance things out again and most of the cuts are not aimed at them. It takes so much money to be elected, our elected officials are so often better off than middle class and they make the laws, write the bills, and cut what they call “subsidies” while cutting taxes for themselves at the same time. They did not really need the tax extensions provided in Jan 11, but fought hard for them, and still want to cut more from poorer people. What’s wrong with this picture?

  4. Pops Says:

    What’s wrong with this picture?

    Excellent question. The answer lies in getting government back into the box, back to the proper role of government as defined by the US and state constitutions (not including some of the wacky interpretations foisted on us in order to do that which is prohibited by said constitutions).

  5. “Do what I say (pass my budget), not what I do (ignore your budget).” | What they didn't teach in law school Says:

    […] If it doesn’t pass one by Friday, the government will shut down. This means, as others have pointed out, that we may see something like what happened in 1995 and 1996: [I]t actually cost the government […]

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